Home Dinner Savory Miso Soup Recipe

Savory Miso Soup Recipe

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Miso soup is a traditional Japanese soup made by combining miso paste, a fermented soybean paste, with dashi, a broth made from kombu and bonito flakes. Tofu, green onions, in addition to seaweed are often added to the soup for flavor and texture.

The soup is typically served hot and is known for its savory, umami flavor. It is a popular choice for a light, satisfying meal and is often enjoyed as part of a traditional Japanese meal, or equally as a side dish alongside a variety of main dishes. Miso soup is also a good source of protein, fiber, and various vitamins and minerals, making it a healthy and delicious choice for any meal.

One of the great things about miso soup is its versatility – you can add a variety of ingredients to suit your taste.  Some common additions include mushrooms, diced vegetables, and seafood.

Miso paste comes in a range of flavors, from sweet and mild to bold and savory. Experimenting with different types of miso paste is a great way to find the flavor that you like best.

Miso soup is not only delicious, but it is also very healthy. Miso paste is a good source of protein, fiber, and various vitamins and minerals. It is also believed to have a number of health benefits, such as aiding in digestion and reducing the risk of certain diseases. So the next time you’re looking for a tasty and healthy meal, give miso soup a try!

Dashi

Dashi, which is the main ingredient for Miso Soup, is a type of broth made with kombu (dried kelp) and bonito flakes (dried, fermented tuna). It is an important ingredient in Japanese cuisine and is used as a base for many dishes, such as miso soup, noodle soups, and braised dishes.

Photo by Dan DeAlmeida on Unsplash

There are two main types of dashi: ichiban dashi, which is made with only kombu and bonito flakes, and niban dashi, which is made with the leftover kombu and bonito flakes from the ichiban dashi.

Dashi is known for its light and delicate flavor, which adds depth and complexity to the dishes it is used in. It is also very easy to make – simply simmer the kombu and bonito flakes in water for a few minutes, then strain out the solids and use the broth as desired. You can also purchase premade dashi broth at many Asian markets or online.

Meals that go well with Miso Soup

Miso soup is a traditional part of the Japanese meal known as “washoku,” which consists of several small dishes served alongside rice. Moreover, it is usually served as one of the first dishes, along with other side dishes such as pickled vegetables, tofu, and grilled fish.

In addition to being served as part of a traditional Japanese meal, miso soup can also be enjoyed as a light appetizer or a side dish to complement a variety of main dishes. Here are a few meal ideas that pair well with miso soup:

  • Grilled or broiled salmon
  • Tempura (deep-fried seafood or vegetables)
  • Sushi or sashimi
  • Teriyaki chicken or beef
  • Stir-fried vegetables
  • Fried rice
  • Noodles dishes, such as udon or soba
  • Korean Beef with rice

Miso soup is also a great way to add some flavor and nutrients to a vegetarian or vegan meal. You can enjoy it on its own, or just as nicely pair it with a variety of plant-based dishes such as tofu stir-fry or grilled vegetables.

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Miso Soup


  • Author: Krista
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Description

Miso soup is a traditional Japanese soup made with miso paste, dashi (a type of broth made with kombu and bonito flakes), and various ingredients such as tofu, green onions, and seaweed. Here is a simple recipe for miso soup that you can try at home:


Ingredients

Scale
  • 4 cups dashi
  • 2 tablespoons miso paste
  • 4 ounces soft tofu, cut into small cubes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped green onions
  • 2 tablespoons dried wakame seaweed, rehydrated and cut into small pieces

Instructions

  1. Heat the dashi in a pot over medium heat until it comes to a simmer.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together a small amount of the hot dashi with the miso paste until smooth.
  3. Pour the miso mixture back into the pot with the rest of the dashi and stir to combine.
  4. Add the tofu and seaweed to the pot and cook for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until the tofu is heated through.
  5. Serve the soup hot, garnished with the green onions. Enjoy!

Notes

  1. Use a good quality dashi: Dashi is a key ingredient in miso soup, so using a high-quality dashi will really enhance the flavor of the soup. You can make your own dashi by simmering kombu (dried kelp) and bonito flakes (dried, fermented tuna) in water, or you can purchase a premade dashi broth.
  2. Don’t overboil the soup: Miso paste is made with fermented soybeans, which can become bitter if it is boiled for too long. To preserve the flavor of the miso, be sure to turn off the heat as soon as you add the miso paste to the soup.
  3. Experiment with different types of miso paste: Miso paste comes in a variety of flavors, from sweet and mild to bold and savory. Experiment with different types of miso paste to find the flavor that you like best.
  4. Customize the ingredients: Miso soup is very versatile and you can add a variety of ingredients to suit your tastes. Some common additions include tofu, green onions, seaweed, mushrooms, and diced vegetables.
  5. Serve the soup hot: Miso soup is traditionally served hot, so be sure to heat the soup through before serving. You can also add a few drops of sesame oil to give the soup a nutty flavor.
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes

In Japan, it is common to add thin, wheat-based noodles called “soba” or “udon” to miso soup. These noodles are usually added to the soup just before serving and are cooked until they are tender, usually in just a few minutes.

Add some Noodles

You can also add other types of noodles to miso soup, such as rice noodles or egg noodles. Just be sure to choose noodles that will cook quickly and won’t overwhelm the delicate flavor of the soup. If you are adding noodles to the soup, you may want to reduce the amount of tofu or other protein that you add, as the noodles will also add substance to the dish.

To add noodles to miso soup, simply bring the soup to a simmer and add the noodles. Cook the noodles according to their package instructions, or until they are tender. Then serve the soup hot, garnished with green onions or other desired toppings.

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